HIV/AIDS – A Winning Battle

AIDS awareness ribbon

The battle against HIV/AIDS can only be won with access to treatment for everyone and by curbing the stigma which surrounds the condition.

The battle against HIV/AIDS can only be won with access to treatment for everyone and by curbing the stigma which surrounds the condition.

In 2016, there have been a few conferences targeting the debate of HIV. Some of the more important ones were the United Nations High-Level Meeting in New York and the AIDS 2016 conference in South Africa.

Following these gatherings, the year 2030 was set as a target for ending the existence of AIDS as a public threat.

Back in 2000, only 700,000 people had access to antiretroviral drugs. In 2016, 15 million people have access to the life-saving treatment. Also, new infections have gone down by 35 percent. This is a major step forward. But there are plenty more things to be accomplished before 2030.

If things don’t go on the same path, the AIDS epidemic could come back or the goal of 2030 could be missed.

One of the issues regarding the HIV condition is insufficient funding. In some places it is declining. Government funding to help HIV efforts in middle and low-income areas fell from 6 billion dollars in 2014 to 5 billion dollars in 2015. This is a worrisome decrease, as the fight against AIDS requires adequate funding.

This fight regards not only governments but all of us. The battle is being won because stakeholders have united to give their time, effort and resources.

Even though the private sector donations amount to just 2 percent of the global effort. But the private funding is essential in some areas, where governments can’t afford to allocate too many resources in this direction.

In 2014, a philanthropic foundation which deals with HIV analyzed the trends and the opportunities of philanthropy and therapy.

One of the conclusions was that ending AIDS in children and teens is an important step towards defeating the disease. However, there is still a gap between what needs this age group has and what resources are available.

Another important problem is that marginalized groups are sometimes excluded from receiving essential health services.

With adequate spending, the goal of ending the threat of AIDS will be accomplished before 2030.

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