Double The Fun: Perseid Meteor Shower Starts

meteor shower

In 2016, the fun will be double. The Perseid Meteor Shower is going to reach a double rate of 150-200 meteors over the course of an hour

In 2016, the fun will be double. The Perseid Meteor Shower is going to reach a double rate of 150-200 meteors over the course of an hour. The peak shower will occur in the middle of August, and it’s going to be spectacular.

On average, the Perseid Meteor Shower consists of 50-75 meteors. But this summer it will double that rate. Bill Cooke revealed that a meteor shower that dense hasn’t happened since 2009.

The Meteor Shower is going to happen in July and August, but the peak will be on the 12th or 13th of August. Unfortunately, this year the moon is going to challenge viewing conditions.

Once you pick an observation place, look half way in the northeastern part of the sky. You’ll see the Perseus constellation. Scientists advice against looking directly at the shower.

The shower will be viewable from both the Southern and the Northern hemispheres. It is one of the most expected showers of the year. And this year it’s almost happening at the same time with the Delta Aquarids, which started on the 12th of July.

The best time to watch the shooting stars will be around 2 to 3 am, as the moon’s light will be weaker.

Meteor showers are streams of space particles which enter Earth’s atmosphere. This happens at very high speeds and produces a comet-like effect, of sparkling trails in parallel trajectories.

These meteor shower events are to be seen at night. Falling stars are more active during the second part of the year. This year, the main events will be the Perseids and Delta Aquarides.

Meteor showers don’t happen very often because most meteors are small, and they rarely enter Earth’s atmosphere. The meteors that do reach the atmosphere fall at a speed of 25,000 miles per hour with incredible energy levels which give out the burning tail effect.

The Slooh Community Observatory will broadcast the event live from a few sites, such as the Canary Islands. Rural areas are the best places to view falling stars, as cities are too strongly lit to allow the faint light of meteors to beam. Clear skies are another factor to be taken into consideration if you want to enjoy a falling-star extravaganza.

Image Source – Flickr

 

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